As an oral historian, artist, and teacher, I dedicate my practice to creating meaningful collaborations and interventions between individuals, communities, and students with history and historiography. Above all, I don’t see the work I do as an historian, or artist, or teacher as existing in separate spheres. I am happiest when they come together.

Encouraging collaboration with their classmates and their teacher, students build confidence in themselves and take responsibility for their learning.

 

As empathetic and active learners, students approach history critically, ready to ask meaningful questions, and knowing that:

  • History is also about the future

  • History isn't objective

  • History is imaginative

  • History is always histories

  • As historians, students, people living in the present, we must strive to do no harm with our work, make positive change, challenge oppression, question assumptions, think and act intersectionally

  • As historians, we must be humble, self-reflective, and vulnerable

All over the Map: 

Imaginary places, phantom islands, and unknown lands

Maps help us find our way; they show us where we are and how to get where we're going. They represent the world around us. Or so it seems. Maps order a world that is in constant movement, create borders people cross every day, and show us places we have never been. And maybe places we can only dream of. In this course, we will explore imaginary places, phantom islands, and unknown lands on and off the map. From Hogsmeade, to Sandy Island, to Medieval maps, we will examine the social and political roles mapping has played throughout history, and what it means to map unknown and imaginary worlds.

Taught for the first time at the 2019 Enrichment Mini-Course Program at Carleton University. Visit the class blog from May 2019.

Image: Maira Kalman, The Principles of Uncertainty